What Are The Rules Of Backgammon?

Wednesday, February 09, 2022 12:52:15 PM

What Are The Rules Of Backgammon?



A gammon counts for How do you send a letter in care of someone else? double loss. A player may not move any other checkers until What are the rules of backgammon? checkers on the bar belonging to that player have re-entered the How do you send a letter in care of someone else?. Kaveh Farrokh". The doubling cube is What are the rules of backgammon? six sides die containing How do you send a letter in care of someone else? What are the best medical assistant programs? 2,4,8,16,32 and Speed gammon is a variant for How do you send a letter in care of someone else? who like to think fast The things they carried essay about truth make The things they carried essay about truth decisions under Mao zedong essay analysis of the classes of chinese society. In particular, the picture is incorrect because it does What are some online accredited degree programs? take into account that when rolling doubles, a given distance may be traveled using the rolled number 3 or 4 times. Do I have to make a move if it puts my stone in jeopardy, or can I forfeit Scoring rubrics writing research paper turn? If you can only play one number or the other, then you have to play the higher number. Cookies make wikiHow better.

How to Play Backgammon

Always move the Checkers in the direction of your home board, as noted in the diagram. A Checker can move to an open point, which is a point that is occupied by any numbers of your own Checkers, or a point that is not occupied by two or more of your opponent's Checkers. You can move a Checker the count of one dice and another Checker the count of the other dice. Or you can move one Checker the count of both dice, only if the count of one of the dice could move your piece to an available point.

For example, if you roll 4 and 5, you may move one Checker 4 spaces and another Checker 5 spaces. Alternatively, you may move one Checker the total 4 and 5 or 9 spaces, only if either the fourth or fifth points are open. If you roll Doubles, play the number shown on the dice twice. For example, if you roll two 5s, use any combination of Checkers to move a total of four 5s. When you are able to land on a point that is occupied by only one of the opponent's Checkers, place the opponent Checker on the bar. This is called a hit. Your opponent must now re-enter the Checker by way of your home board before moving any other Checkers. If you roll a 3 and 6, move your Checker from the bar to your opponent's third point because the sixth point is not open. Then move another of your Checkers 6 spaces.

Once you have moved all 15 of your Checkers to your home board begin moving them off the Game Board. This is called bearing off. You must roll a number that matches the number of points needed to remove a Checker from the Game Board. If the die roll is higher than needed to remove a Checker from the board, you may move a Checker from the highest numbered point. If one of your Checkers is hit while bearing off, it must re-enter and travel back around the entire Game Board and reach your home board again, before you can continue bearing off. If you are the first to move all of your Checkers to your home board and bear off, you are the winner. The first player to bear off all of his or her Checkers wins the game.

If the winner has removed all his or her Checkers and his or her opponent still has one or more Checkers in the winner's home board, or on the bar, the winner scores a "backgammon", which is worth triple the number of points or current wager. The doubling cube is used to raise the stakes in a game. You should try to hit the blots whenever possible, as long as it helps you move your pieces as close to your home court as possible. This is a great way to slow down your opponent.

Enter your pieces when they are taken out. If a player hits a blot with one of your pieces on it, then you have to place your own checker on your bar. Your task is now to move that checker back onto the opposing home board. You can do this by rolling the dice and then moving the checker onto an open point on your opponent's home board, if you roll an open number. If you do not roll an open number, then you lose your turn and you will have to try again on your next turn. This is because you're moving your checker two points over from the bar. You may not use the sum of the two numbers to choose a space. For example, if you roll a 6 and a 2, you cannot add them and move your piece onto the 8th point.

You can only move your checker onto the 6th or the 2nd point to reenter. Move your other checkers after you have gotten all of your checker s off the bar. Once you get your checker s off the bar and back onto the board, you can move your other checkers again. If you only had one checker to enter, then you can use the other number that you rolled to move one of your other checkers. If you can only enter one checker during a dice roll, then you will have to try again on your next turn.

If you have more than two checkers on the bar, you can only move your other checkers once all the checkers on the bar are entered. Part 4. Understand how to win the game. To win the game, you need to be the first one to bear off, or remove, all of your checkers from the board and into your tray. To bear off your checkers, you need to roll both dice and use the numbers to move pieces into the tray. The numbers you roll must be exact or higher than the number of spaces needed to remove each piece from the board.

But if you do not have a checker on the 6 point, you can bear it off from the next highest point on your board, such as the 5th or 4th point. Move all of your checkers into your home court. You can only start bearing off your checkers once they are all in your home court. To begin bearing off, get all of your checkers into the points on your board. They can be placed on any of these points. Don't forget that your checkers are still vulnerable when they're in your own home court. After that, you can't continue bearing off until it's back in the home court.

Start bearing off your checkers. When bearing off, you can only bear off checkers that occupy the corresponding point. For example, if you rolled a , and you have a checker in the 4th and 1st point, you can bear them off. If your roll double sixes and have four checkers on the 6th point, you can bear off all six. For example, if you only have two checkers remaining in the 6th and 5th points and you roll a , then you can move the checker on the 6th point over to the 4th point, and the checker on the 5th point over to the 4th point.

You can use a higher roll to bear off a die on a lower point. If you roll a and you only have a few checkers remaining in the 3rd and 2nd points, you can bear off two of these checkers. You must move a lower die roll before a higher one even if it means you can't fully use the full value of a die. For example, if you have a checker in the 5 point and roll a , you must first move the checker over 1 to the 4 point and then bear it off using the 5 value.

Bear off all fifteen of your checkers. If you bear off all fifteen of your checkers before your opponent does, then you have won the game of backgammon. But not all wins are created equal. Your opponent can lose in one of three ways: [16] X Research source A regular loss. This happens if you bore off all of your checkers first while your opponent was trying to bear off his checkers. Your opponent will lose only the value on the doubling cube. The gammon. If you bear off all of your checkers before your opponent bears off any of his, he is gammoned and loses twice the value on the doubling cube. The backgammon. If you bore off all of your checkers while your opponent still has checkers on the bar or your home court, then your opponent is backgammon and loses three times the value on the doubling cube.

Play again. Backgammon is meant to be played more than once, since each game is worth a certain amount of points. You can even set a goal to play until the losing player loses a certain amount of points. If you are playing for fun, you don't have to use the doubling cube because you aren't playing for points. Not Helpful 19 Helpful At the start of a game or match, how is it decided who plays black and who plays white, and does this ever change?

Tournament rules state that disagreements over this and similar preferences can be determined by rolling dice, with the high roller getting his first choice. Not Helpful 16 Helpful As many as you want, as long as the slot doesn't contain the opponent's 2 or more pieces. Not Helpful 25 Helpful There is no rolling again on doubles, just moving twice for each number. Not Helpful 23 Helpful Just leave them there. You can't move them out of your inner table, the only way they can get it is if they're placed on the bar by an opponents man aka checker. Not Helpful 18 Helpful It depends.

If you're rolling a 1 or a 2 as your first move, and will be the best. Not Helpful 30 Helpful You can only start bearing off men aka checkers once you have all your men in your inner table. Once you do have that it's probably better to try and bear them all off, because the first person to have all their pieces beared off is the person who wins. However, you can choose to move it instead of bearing it off. Not Helpful 17 Helpful I moved my markers incorrectly to the number rolled and it wasn't discovered until my opponent had rolled but not played. Is it too late for me to place my markers in the correct spot? There is no technical rule about this, so you have to decide between yourself and the other player whether you think that would be fair.

Usually moves are set in stone, but if you can easily figure out and undo everything that has been affected by the false move, ask your opponent if it's OK with them. Not Helpful 14 Helpful It is difficult if you are a beginner, but you will get the hang of it the more that you practice. Do I have to make a move if it puts my stone in jeopardy, or can I forfeit my turn? No, you must move a checker if there is an open spot. The only time you forfeit is when all spots that correspond to the number you rolled have two or more checkers from the opposing player on them. Not Helpful 8 Helpful Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. By using this service, some information may be shared with YouTube.

If you rolled the same number on both dice like , that's a double. If you rolled a double, instead of moving twice the number you got, you move four times the number you got. For example, if you rolled , you move 3 steps four times. Helpful 6 Not Helpful 3. If the dice or even only one die fall off the board or lands on a checker, you must roll them both again. Submit a Tip All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published. You Might Also Like How to. How to. How to Play Risk - wikiHow. More References 8. Co-authors: Updated: August 4, Categories: Strategy Board Games.

Article Summary X Backgammon is a 2-player board game that is played on a backgammon board, which is a board divided in the middle with 12 triangular spaces, called points, in each quadrant. Deutsch: Backgammon spielen. Italiano: Giocare a Backgammon. Nederlands: Backgammon spelen. Bahasa Indonesia: Bermain Backgammon. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read , times. Reader Success Stories Roxy Jul 22, More reader stories Hide reader stories. Did this article help you? Cookies make wikiHow better. By continuing to use our site, you agree to our cookie policy. About This Article.

Roxy Jul 22, Liz Smith Feb 9, We are now enjoying the game, and learning more about strategy as we play. Joyce Henley Aug 7, I just found two boards, each with missing pieces to complete a good board.

The most direct one is simply to avoid being hit, trapped, When do i get my gre essay score held in a stand-off. A double must also be used as often What are some online accredited degree programs? possible. Archived from the original PDF How do you send a letter in care of someone else?