Denis Diderot La Religieuse Dissertation

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Denis Diderot La Religieuse Dissertation



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DIDEROT, Denis – La Religieuse LIVRE AUDIO FRANCAIS FULL AUDIOBOOK FRENCH

View all 22 comments. Suzanne, the narrator, is sixteen years old, two sisters, a lawyer father with "more fortune than necessary to establish them solidly". The problem, her father is not her father, the two sisters will each have half of the fortune, and Suzanne will find herself in a convent to atone for her mother's sin. The wish of her parents is not hers, and she will do everything to get out of these convents, which will reserve cruel moments for her.

To write this book, Diderot started from a real fact. Through the halls and cells of a convent, guarded by high walls and austere religious customs, we follow a young nun making arrangements to escape a future that was imposed on her. She has a knack for logic and no ear for vocation, so she is not able to find any justification for all the suffering and pious rules that govern her. In her fight for freedom she uses all the means of revolt there are: open protest, rigid obedience, lawsuit, relocation etc.

Embracing her destiny is not a viable alter Through the halls and cells of a convent, guarded by high walls and austere religious customs, we follow a young nun making arrangements to escape a future that was imposed on her. Embracing her destiny is not a viable alternative and even an ungodly reader prays with her that it will not become one. Our habits and rituals may seem ridiculous to an outside observer, all the more so, when there is no reason behind them. She is as close to a spring of meaning as it gets and everything she encounters forces her to drink from it: old traditions, that must have some sense to have lasted for so long and to be so highly respected; the lives of fellow nuns that must be meaningful in some way.

Nevertheless she finds none for herself and remains detached. Although this novel is an epitome of all the wrongdoings of religious institutions to a degree that it made me laugh, I still felt a bit cheated by the final twist; but in a most charming way there is. I wanted to go back in time when stories emerged in passing and there was still as much effort put in personal pursuits as it was in professional ones… If, of course, such a time ever existed and it was not reserved for the chosen few who might as well be living today.

I would love to be a nun! Unfortunately all the nun positions are filled at the moment, despite me faking three months nunning experience on my CV. This book is amazing! Diderot is such a fiendishly funny satirist, wiping the floor with all his 18thC cronies. The Nun takes us from a sadistic convent regime of starving and torture into a sumptuous world of desirous shephebes my coinage—hire me someone! And a wee bit titillating. The book was originally orchestrated as a hoax, which makes me love Diderot even more. View all 25 comments. At face value, this is a slim and straight-forward epistolary novel about a young woman who is forced into covenant life by her awful, self-absorbed parents, who then proceeds to stand firm to her ideals as she is antagonized by sadistic, power-hungry hypocrites and mentally disturbed sex fiends.

While Diderot was very much an atheist, he does a praiseworthy turn here giving voice to a sincerely religious narrator that has no desire to live the claustrophobic and Wowzers! While Diderot was very much an atheist, he does a praiseworthy turn here giving voice to a sincerely religious narrator that has no desire to live the claustrophobic and tedious life of a nun. Not so much an attack against religion as much as an attack on the socially constructed institution of religion, Diderot weaves subtle and sublime satire into his novel, making it not only a potent lashing of the people who misuse religion as a means of taking out their petty, insensible vengeance on the world, but also a melancholy cry of empathy for the men and women who find themselves trapped in the repressed, anti-physical hologram that is the lifestyle of the insanely devout.

Bonus points for Diderot's generous characterizations of the complexities of gender roles waaay before there was any modern idea such as lesbianism An act of pre-modern postmodern genius or just a helluva twist, take your pick. Read this book. View all 13 comments. Man was born to live with his fellow human beings. Separate him, isolate him, his character will go bad, a thousand ridiculous affects will invade his heart, extravagant thoughts will germinate in his brain, like thorns in an uncultivated land. Given the untimely arrival of our Arctic Vortex, it is fitting that The Nun shudders with a frozen despair.

Bone chilling mornings are well suited for such guided tours of the dark side. Abandon your preconceptions of the Enlightenment and moral cautionary Man was born to live with his fellow human beings. Abandon your preconceptions of the Enlightenment and moral cautionary tales, Diderot's creation is terrifying. Apparently it was a practical joke used to trick a friend to return to Paris from the countryside. The novel takes the form of an escaped nun tracing her history in a lengthy letter about a series of convents, ones where the prevailing theme is obedience. One thinks of Martin Amis, "give some someone absolute control over another and thoughts soon turn to torture.

Shelves: whatthe-hell. This went down in one sitting: less a tribute to the literary merits of this novel and more an expose of my coarse, voyeuristic nature. Of the very base, chav chasing, track suit wearing, Vicky Pollard yeah but no but yeah variety where I settle my newly acquired Christmas overhang on the settee, spread out the fries and Baconnaise washed down with a spot of bitter shandy and munch my way through this epic saga of nuns being very, very naughty. In France. And, lets face it, nobody does naughty l This went down in one sitting: less a tribute to the literary merits of this novel and more an expose of my coarse, voyeuristic nature.

And, lets face it, nobody does naughty like the French except maybe Berlusconi and the Bunga Bunga parties. Well, whose laughing now. Wait, that came out wrong, like a bad Bushism. Some academic did to explain the fact that up to half of all patrician females thats the nobility to you and me were voluntarily-on-purpose left in these convents against their will.

Once inside, Suzanne is subjected to all kinds of debauchery, torture, sexual harassment, incarceration, and basically any degrading acts you can think of. So, as all of this action or inaction, depending on your point of view was developing, I did get this slightly uncomfortable snapshotty feeling of reading this novel for all the wrong reasons: namely a vacuous mesmerisation is that a word? The torture, the cruelty, the petty shenanigans of a bunch of sexually frustrated and extremely bored nuns. And once you were in, you were in. Breaking the vows was impossible.

Que desolee. I was reading it to see how bad those nuns could get. View all 8 comments. This is an interesting novella, written in the form of a letter, by a nun to someone she hopes will help her break the vows which she took by force. The young French girl, Suzanne, is a victim of circumstances, hated by her family through no fault of her own, and forced to enter a convent. She takes the orders against her wishes although she realizes she has no vocation. At the convent she falls into the bad books of the Mother Superior and is abused horrifically, sadistically even.

Some of the me This is an interesting novella, written in the form of a letter, by a nun to someone she hopes will help her break the vows which she took by force. Some of the methods the nuns used to abuse her were pretty shocking. The book is not an attack on Catholicism by any means; Suzanne never loses her faith despite her ordeals. It brings to the forefront the awful practice of forcing young girls into convents, often when they were as young as 15 too young to really know what was going on. Truly, Diderot paints convent life in the most awful way. As Suzanne said, "I have plenty of courage, but no courage in the world can hold out in the face of neglect, solitude and persecution.

Alas, this was not the case in this book. View all 51 comments. Set in France during the late 's tells the story of a young woman who becomes a Nun. Sister Suzanne has no vocation for the religious life but is forced to take the veil by her family to atone for sins not of her doing. Suzanne is too pretty, too intelligent, too strong willed, unfortunately she is also thought to be illegitimate. Her life in various convents is untenable and harsh. Suzanne's story is told in the form of letters as she seeks outside help to rescind her vows. Even more interes Set in France during the late 's tells the story of a young woman who becomes a Nun.

Even more interesting is the circumstances surrounding "The Nun' by the author and the period that the novel was written in. From the Boxall list. Jun 16, K. Shelves: classics , core. Funny classic novel about a nun! This novel was originally written as a joke! And a joke it should be read and enjoyed! Completed in c. Diderot wrote a letter to his retired companion Marquis de Croismare to entice him to retreat back to Paris. The letter was supposed to be from a nun incarcerated in a convent asking Croismare to save her. Many o Funny classic novel about a nun! Many of Diderot's friends found the letters amusing so Diderot revised and made it into a novel.

Her mother had an affair with another man and although Suzanne grew up with her mother's real husband, she felt unloved. When she began to have admirers, her parents brought her to a convent to become a nun. In front of the altar when the priest asked if she wanted to be come a nun, she answered no. Her parents plead to her but she persisted. But they died. So, with nowhere else to go, she finally agreed. However, she still felt trapped and she started to create scenes in the convent. She was punished until a priest transferred her to another convent.

In that other convent, she was molested by the Mother Superior. The plot is not funny. Rather, if it were true in the 18th century France where most people are catholics , it could have created a scandal. Also, learning in the book's introduction that it was supposed to be a joke, I could not help but laugh in many scenes in it. My favorite is that part when after Suzanne was punished by the nuns, she prayed loud to God to forgive her tormentors. However, it is also written in Wikipedia that Diderot had a nun sister who died in a French Catholic church from overwork. This was said to have changed his view on religion.

Yesterday, I was in Fullybooked Rockwell with my father-in-law. We were celebrating Father's Day together with my family and his wife and our US-based visiting ninang. One of them was about WWII and the other one is a book on humor jokes. He said that he does not read fiction because they are just gawa-gawa ng tao. I retorted that fiction books may have been that but most of them have basis in real life. They are just made into fiction to be more interesting. Non-fiction could also be gawa-gawa so we cannot be sure if they are all true. Like The Nun. We know about those scandals inside the church. Like the valiant story of McArthur or the fake medals of President Marcos that were erroneously written in our history.

That episode in Desperate Housewives was not funny at all. Some Filipino doctors in the US even marched on the streets demanding apology from Fox and the producers of the show. I seldom buy regular-priced books. For more than a year now, I have not been buying clothes except those given to me during holidays Father's Day, my birthday and Christmas by my family and friends. I have "rainy days" fund. However, I still know how to share and how to enjoy money to bring me happiness. Good friends and books like The Nun do make me happy. View all 9 comments.

A novel about nun-and-nun lesbian love. In a broader context, about what happens when piety is imposed against one's free will. From his personal experience, Denis Diderot knew it is tragic. His own sister, forced into an Ursuline convent, lost her mind and died there, insane. He himself was once locked up in a monastery by his own father who had wanted him to become a priest. He escaped and instead married his Nanette. This is an 18th century novel and when it was written by this Frenchman Dider A novel about nun-and-nun lesbian love.

This is an 18th century novel and when it was written by this Frenchman Diderot one 1 in every Frenchwomen was a nun. Young, beautiful French girls were being sent to convents against their will for all sorts of reasons e. The country then remarkably had more nuns than monks: 5, convents with around 55, nuns compared to only 3, monasteries which were homes to around 30, monks. It would have been not much a problem had these nuns and monks been allowed to socialize or interact with each other but these were Catholic nuns and monks so celibacy and chastity were rigid rules--at least on paper.

Through a character in the novel Diderot passionately lashes at this system, at these rash, forced and unnatural vows taken by these creatures of the flesh: "Can these vows, which fly in the face of our natural inclinations, ever be properly observed by anyone other than a few abnormal creatures in whom the seeds of passion have withered and whom we should rightly consider as monsters, if the current state of our knowledge allow us to understand the internal structure of man as easily and as well as we understand his external form? Do all those doleful ceremonies that are performed at the taking of the habit and at the profession, when a man or woman is dedicated to the monastic life and to misfortune, actually suspend our animal instincts?

On the contrary, are not those very instincts stirred up in the silence, constraint, and idleness, and with a violence unknown to people in the world outside who are swept along by a host of distractions? Where does one see minds obsessed by impure visions which haunt them and torment them? Where does one see that profound boredom, that pallor, and those skeletal forms which are all symptoms of nature languishing and wasting away? Where are the nights troubled by groans and days filled with tears shed needlessly and preceded by some mysterious melancholy? Where does nature, revolted by a constraint for which it is not intended, smash the obstacles put in its way, become enraged, and throw the whole animal system into incurable disarray?

Where have spite and whim destroyed all social qualities? Where does man, considering himself but an ephemeral, transitory being, treat the sweetest relationships of this world with disinterest, as a traveller treats the things he comes across? Where is the dwelling place of coercion, disgust, and hysteria? Where is the home of servitude and despotism? Where is undying hatred?

Where are the passions nurtured in silence? Mother Superiors having orgasms while newly entered nuns, fresh and innocent, sat on their laps? Or one, after having touched and praised every part of a young nun's body, who would piously intone: "No, it is the greatest joy that God has called her to the cloistered life; with a figure like that in the outside world she would have driven every man she set her eyes on to damnation, and she would have bee damned with them.

All God's ways are just! View all 6 comments. Doesn't get into the hot girl-on-girl action 'til like halfway through the book, and then it's super not hot. If you're looking for hot 18th-century girl on girl action, you gotta go with Fanny Hill. It's pleasant and enjoyable to read. If you're only going to read one blasphemous 18th-century lit book this ear, it has to be The Monk, and you can put that on your movie posters. So, yeah, there you go. Better evil clergy in The Monk; better lesbian sex in Fanny Hill. The Nun: fine. View 1 comment. Diderot finished The Nun in , but it wasn't published in book form until , twelve years after Diderot's death. What's interesting about this is that the novel is based on a practical joke played on the Marquis de Croismare.

The Marquis had stayed in Normandy for several years, when one day he received a letter, where a young nun asked help after having escaped from a convent. This "nun" was actually Diderot and his friends. The story was believable, because the letter was based on Margue Diderot finished The Nun in , but it wasn't published in book form until , twelve years after Diderot's death. The story was believable, because the letter was based on Marguerite Delamarre 's case, in which de Croismare had been involved details here. The joke failed, because the Marquis, instead of returning to Paris, offered the girl a sanctuary in Normandy, so naturally the girl had to be "killed". Surprisingly, after finding out the truth, the Marquis just laughed and didn't mind at all.

Diderot then developed his novel from these letters. His sister went mad and died in a convent, and as one of the leading figures of the Enlightenment, a critic of religion, and a defender of women or at least he was aware that they were treated as children , Diderot's stance on the convent system doesn't come as a surprise. Although, to be more specific, the novel deals with the practice of sending girls to convents against their will for various reasons Delamarre was three when she began her convent life.

Financial difficulties and too many mouths to feed? Off to the convent! Immoral behavior? Difficult to gather up a dowry, so that your daughter can't get married? In midth century every th Frenchwoman was a nun, and there were double as many convents and nuns 55 than monasteries and monks. Suzanne, the protagonist, is genuinely religious, but she doesn't have a calling to be a nun. Her parents force her into a convent, because she's a consequence from her mother's affair, so her step father's and mother's hate and guilt lead to Suzanne feeling like she has a duty to move away from her family's, especially her siblings' who worry about their inheritance, range of vision.

In short, she has way too much understanding toward her mother's situation. When Suzanne realizes the truth about convent life, it's already too late. She's forced to suffer from physical abuse and the childish bullying of the nuns and the Mother Superior. A Mother Superior, who brags about how she's able to turn the nuns into monsters at any given moment. It's distressing to read how Suzanne tries to escape her predicament by appealing to outsiders and by getting a lawyer, because the canon law had great weight in 18th century France.

An individual, especially a girl, had very little power to decide about their own life. In real cases, the lawyers who appealed on behalf of their clients, drew attention to the women's passiveness, childlikeness, and their inability to make decisions. One case had a monk, and he was described with the same terms, so that he appeared more feminine and pathetic. The society simply considered those who wanted to get out of the convents hysterical and too keen on independence.

The vow you made to God was binding, and if you tried to sever that tie, the society's family values were practically about to get destroyed Convents and Nuns in Eighteenth-century French Politics and Culture by Mita Choudhury. When Suzanne switches convents, her inexperience once again leads to trouble with the Mother Superior, but this time just causes confusion in the girl's naive mind. Diderot addresses women's sexual frustration boldly but not scandalously, and Suzanne isn't unhappy because she lost her loved one, so The Nun isn't comparable to earlier semi-pornographic nun fantasies written by men. The Nun , however, is vastly different, because suicidal nuns who tear their hair and go mad mostly just make you sad.

There are many similarities with Delamarre's story, but you can find out yourselves what kind of an ending Suzanne has. So far probably the most accessible 18th century novel I've read, but still very thought-provoking and intelligent. Russell Goulbourne 's translation is clear and fluent, and the Oxford World's Classics edition has a great introduction with the original letters printed in the appendix. Diderot's criticism of religion is sharp, but he avoids preaching, and instead focuses on Suzanne's thoughts and experiences. There were times when the story lagged quite a bit, because the plot is pretty nonexistent, but that's minor. So where's the harm in loving one another, in saying so and in showing it?

It's so pleasant! The story of Denis Diderot 's The Nun started life as a practical joke on the Marquis whose name is mentioned in the first paragraph. But the more that Diderot looked at it, the more he thought there was a good work of fiction there. It was rather shameful how young women were locked up in cloistered nunneries because 1 their families were poor and 2 the young women in question were not legitimate. Diderot's Sister Sainte-Suzanne is a case which could conceivably happen. Her second convent was The story of Denis Diderot 's The Nun started life as a practical joke on the Marquis whose name is mentioned in the first paragraph. Her second convent was run by a sadist; and her third, by a lesbian.

Eventually Suzanne manages to escape, but the author deliberately leaves the ending open. We have to see The Nun in its historical context in the Enlightement age,Denis Diderot a main autor in this time,a enciclopedist that as others put in question allstablished dogmas and ideas. The novel tell We have to see The Nun in its historical context in the Enlightement age,Denis Diderot a main autor in this time,a enciclopedist that as others put in question allstablished dogmas and ideas. By all this, a scandalous novel till not long ago, and by obvious reasons only recently accesible in Spain as many others this could be matter for a whole book Published over two hundred years ago, I can only imagine what kind of uproar and scandal it must've caused, because it's still pretty caustic and racy, even by today's standards.

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